June 2009

June 1, 2009 in 2009 by Webmaster

June: In this Issue

Special Days and Monthly Celebrations

Grandma really enjoys celebrations and special days; so each month she will share a few ideas that she thinks are interesting.

Good Health Can Be Yummy

Recipes and thoughts on making food taste good and build healthy bodies. Read more…

Pure and Simple News

Research summaries and what it could mean to us.

Making it Happen

Hints and recipes for applying nutrition to everyday life.

Special Days and Monthly Celebrations

Good Times, Good Friends, and Good Food.

Raggedy Ann & Andy Day: June 13-14

The spirited stories of Raggedy Ann and Andy were endearing to me as a young girl growing up in the post-war baby boom era. Johnny (John Barton) Gruelle (1880 – 1938), the artist and author who created Raggedy Ann and Andy, wrote stories that introduced ethics and values to his readers. I don’t think that the allure of Raggedy Ann and Andy has completely dissipated in all those years. Their faces make you just want to smile.

Before I had children, I made three sets of Raggedy Ann and Andy dolls for my three nieces. I learned about 30 years later that my own daughter had always wished that I had made a set for her – so this is a picture of the set that I made for her a few years ago. They’re my daughter’s dolls, but it appears that my darling grandchildren have helped one them to become a true ‘raggedy doll – is that what makes them a little more precious?

When my three children were small, I used to serve food ingredients (as art supplies) so they could make Raggedy Ann and Andy on their plates. I put peaches, pears, pancakes, or cottage cheese (face); grated carrots or yellow grated cheese (hair); raisins, olives (eyes) cherries, sliced red apple or red pepper (nose); red apples or red pepper (lips); cucumbers or apples (ears); in bowls and they would choose how to make their ‘doll dish.’ It was a huge hit – and they had fun eating their fruits and vegetables! Happy Raggedy Ann and Andy Day!

Father’s Day, the Summer Solstice: June 21 and Family History Day: June 14

This year both Father’s Day and the Summer Solstice (longest day of the year) are on the same day, June 21st. What a great day to have a family gathering to honor your father or grandfather – you can soak up the rays during a long garden party. If you don’t have a chance to find out some stories about your family’s history the week before Family History Day, you can do a little detective work during the long lazy summer Father’s Day celebration. Look in our Good Health Can Be Yummy section to see some ideas for keeping Dad’s heart healthy on Father’s Day.

Great Outdoors Month

June is Great Outdoors Month; don’t forget to have Dr. Grandma’s Pancake Mix on hand for camping trips. Pancakes are perfect for the campsite or the cabin. Best wishes for an enjoyable time in the beautiful great outdoors! A little hint: we sometimes put previously cooked pancakes in a zip bag; then all you have to do is just warm them.

Good Health Can Be Yummy

Recipes and thoughts on making food taste good, while building healthy bodies.

So many of our customers wish to use extra virgin olive oil, but many food items they would like to purchase from food stores are made using only less healthful vegetable oils. One answer is to make your own. The tortilla recipe below is an example of substituting extra virgin olive oil for a less healthy oil. It also substitutes whole-wheat flour in making the tortillas instead of refined white flour. Many of our customers are trying to move toward their own customized version of a Mediterranean diet, so this is one way to help make tacos or other traditional recipes based on both healthy oil and 100% whole grain.

Grandma’s Version of Mexican Tortillas
or Mediterranean Whole Wheat Tortillas

2 cups Dr. Grandma’s 100% organic whole-wheat flour
1 tsp baking powder
½ scant tsp. salt
2 Tbsp. Extra Virgin Olive Oil
½ cup warm water

Mix the flour, baking powder and salt. Stir in the oil, then use fingers or pastry blender to distribute evenly. Add the warm water a little at a time. Knead on a floured surface until you have a smooth ball (about 20 times). Let it rest for about 20 minutes. Note: If you skip this step, it will be difficult to roll to a thin tortilla.

Step 1: Divide the dough into 12 balls – if you want them to be bigger just make fewer balls.

Step 2: Roll on a floured surface, turning to keep round shape.

Step 3: Cook on an un-greased medium-high heat skillet on each side about 30 seconds, the tortilla gets some bubbles.

Stack on a plate with waxed paper between the layers. After they are cool, put into a plastic bag. Store in the refrigerator, or they can be frozen.

Fish Tacos

Since I’m a native of sunny southern California, where the Mexican cuisine has influenced the taste buds of most, I’ve learned to enjoy fish tacos. It’s easy to put together a variety of vegetables and fish on a warm tortilla and then smother it with fresh salsa.

A nice thing about tacos is that you can make it buffet-style. Each person assembles their taco the way they like it.

Diced tomatoes
Lettuce
Shredded cabbage, red and/or green
Grilled fish or canned tuna, poultry or meat, some like pulled pork
Limes
Chopped cilantro
Grated cheese
Diced avocado or guacamole
Sour cream or yogurt
Salsa

Instead of plain shredded cabbage make a little quick cabbage slaw.

1 ½ cup shredded red cabbage
1 ½ cup shredded green cabbage
1 tbsp. minced red onion

Mix:

1 tbsp. yogurt
1 tbsp. mayonnaise
1 tbsp. lime juice
pepper to taste

Stir into the cabbage and onions.

The following fish relish recipe from a past Dr. Grandma’s newsletter is one nice option.

Fish Relish

1 cup fresh pineapple tidbits
5 – 6 radishes chopped fairly small
1 4 oz. can diced green chilies
1 Tbsp. lime zest
Juice of 1 lime
1 chopped tomato
Mix the above ingredients and serve on fish.

Mango Kiwi Salsa (Dr. Grandpa loves this!)

1 cup of diced peeled mango
¾ cup diced kiwi fruit
1 tbsp minced green chilies
2 tbsp lime juice
1 tsp Dr. Grandma’s Delight Sweetener or sugar
1 tbsp chopped cilantro or parsley

Gently mix the ingredients.

How to Slice a Mango

Pure and Simple News

Health Research summaries and what it could mean to us.

This month I thought that I would write something to help those with diabetes; then I read an article in Today’s Dietitian and decided that managing weight is important to those with diabetes and also to a large number of others. Managing eating behaviors in order to manage hunger is an important part of managing weight.

Managing Hunger Without Overeating

An author of recent diet books tell us that refraining from eating when we’re hungry will not lead to death – they say we can do it – not eat, that is. In my decades of work in dietetics, I’ve always thought that managing hunger is a more acceptable goal than trying not to eat, as hunger pangs have damaged many a resolve to lose weight. Managing hunger is one of the important reasons for eating. If we decrease our energy intake below our present needs, we will feel hungry. If we don’t learn how to manage hunger while trying to lose weight, it is not likely that we will be able to stick with a new eating plan in the long term. The fact is that we find hunger uncomfortable; hunger has always driven our ancestors to find food and find it fast!

You can’t trick the body not to feel hunger – the signals (hormones and neuropeptides) will override any attempted trick. If there is an energy intake deficit – your body will send you a signal (we call it hunger).

Studies have consistently shown that increases in calorie intake can result from increases in food and beverage variety, increases in food energy density, and increases in the portion size of foods and beverages. These studies give us clues about how to manage hunger. If you are presented with an ‘all you can eat’ buffet, it can be challenging to any weight control resolve. Stay away from any form of easy availability to food in your immediate environment. Appetite is influenced by our exposure to food (just seeing it), visual and auditory suggestions (television commercials), emotions (happy or sad – both are known to increase hunger), palatability (creamy, crunchy, spicy and so on), availability (just knowing that it’s in the house). Some researchers believe that the easy availability of food in our environment may cause our drive to eat to be out of whack. Hunger is certainly not the only issue being resolved when we eat. We eat for a list of social and emotional reasons, parties, events, celebrations and so on.

Knowing that the research on what is associated with increased hunger, the following are a few strategies that may give you a fighting chance against this inner urge to eat and eat now.

Strategies:

1. Controlling the Environment: Fill the refrigerator and pantry with foods that are not so calorie dense. In other words, but fill up on tasty, healthy, filling foods that will reduce those hunger pangs safely, and fill up those painful empty spaces. Make sure that plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables are easily available in the house; ideally, attractively ready to eat. If you want to eat fewer cookies, ice cream, cakes and candy; or fatty steaks, chips, cheese and meats, then don’t stock the cupboards with these calorie-dense foods.

Sometimes controlling your environment is just a matter of relocating yourself. When your at a reception or party with a table of snacks, appetizers, hor’dourves and petit fours, look around and find a place to visit with the guests without having the constant temptation of the food calling you for just one more little appetizer. Yikes! Some are 200 – 300 calories each.

2. Beverages: Select and make available low-cal beverages: Beware of the
calories in beverages. Sugar-sweetened soda (including fructose), juices, sports drinks, and flavored coffee drinks contain hundreds of calories that are often ignored as contributing to the daily intake. These calories are especially sneaky, because beverage calories do not make you feel as full, or as satisfied as the calories from solid foods. In addition, drinks deliver the calories faster than solids. Drinks loaded with sugar deliver sugar into the bloodstream VERY rapidly – bad news for diabetics or pre-diabetics.

Some evidence: In 2008 a study by B.A. Rolls published in Appetite showed that eating a whole apple reduced the calorie intake at the next meal by 15% in comparison to the group who slurped applesauce or drank apple juice, (with and without fiber). The apple increased satiety better (being satisfied) which carried over to the next meal.

Do an experiment; I have; and many of my patients have. Just eat a whole piece of fruit – be surprised how it will take the edge off of hunger.

3. Starters: In another study published in 2007 by B.A. Rolls and published in Appetite it was shown that intake of soup as a starter to a meal resulted in a 20% lower total meal calorie intake, when compared to having no soup. That’s great news if you realize that eating a low calorie starter can result in a lower calorie intake overall. But be careful not to choose creamy, cheesy heavily starchy soups. Having a salad works similarly, but if you load the salad with fatty dressing, cheese, and meat, it will be difficult to benefit. To fill up some of your eating capacity with healthy, low calorie foods, you cannot let high-calorie ingredients sneak into the soup or salad.

4. Plenty of Fruits and Vegetables: High water content fruits and vegetables in abundance is a great place to start in the war on hunger. Because people often eat the same volume of food, consuming fruits and vegetables less dense in calories is a useful trick.

5. Fiber is a Winner: Check out the April Dr. Grandma’s Newsletter. In a review, Sharon Palmer listed several ways that fiber helps make you feel fuller:

a. It stays in the gut longer and tends to make you feel fuller longer.
b. It displaces calories from the diet.
c. It increases chewing, which causes more secretion of saliva and gastric juices,
and thus stomach expansion and increased satiety
d. It also may reduce the absorption efficiency of the small intestine.

J. L. Slavin cautions against the product form chosen for eating whole grains. She points out that having a whole grain cookie will have a much higher calorie density than whole grain food products made without the sugar and fat. Note: Dr. Grandma’s baked donuts in this newsletter are an excellent example that all whole grains are not created equally. Dr. Grandma’s strives to keep your intake of fiber up while keeping the calories way down!

6. Portion Size is Important: In another study by Rolls in 2004, the participants of the study were served a lunch entrée at one of two levels of energy density in one of three portions sizes. The subjects consumed 56% more calories when served the largest portions of the energy dense entrée, than when they were served the smallest portion of the low-energy-dense entrée. Here’s the kicker, there was no difference in the participant’s ratings of their hunger and fullness after the meals. It’s true! You may be satisfied on a smaller portion.

An example: Decades ago when I was the director of a weight loss program and working very diligently with my patients, I talked to a drug rep that stopped by our offices every month, or so. He had lost a significant amount of weight; so being in the ‘weight loss business’ I asked, “How did you do it?” He said that all he did was to cut his servings to half or two-thirds of what he normally ate – he continued to eat the same foods.

7. Skipping meals is a no-no! It is known that those who skip breakfast tend to weigh more. Why? It doesn’t make sense that skipping a meal doesn’t add up to a lower calorie intake. Whenever we skip a meal – or just go for a long time between meals, we more than make up for it later. Skipping meals increases our hunger way out of proportion to what we need. When the opportunity comes, we ravenously consume much more than we need to make up for the missed meal.

8. Balancing Act: As related to the balance of protein, carbohydrates and fat, Rolls suggests that the focus should be on filling up on low-energy-dense foods rather than on percentages of fats, protein, and carbohydrate in the diet.

Ideas for this section from “Taking Control of Hunger – Lessons on Calming Appetite and Managing Weight” by Sharon Palmer, Today’s Dietitian, Vol. 11 No. 4, p.28.

Making it Happen

Hints and recipes for applying nutrition to everyday life.

This month we have several new ways to make a good-for-you breakfast that will help keep Dad’s heart healthy – start the day with baked donuts or gourmet crepes.

Healthy Father’s Day Crepes

Ingredients:

1 cup Dr. Grandma’s 100% Organic Whole-Wheat Flour
1 teaspoon Dr. Grandma’s Delight Sweetener or sugar (for dessert crepes)
¼ teaspoon salt
3 large eggs
1½ cup non-fat milk
3 teaspoons extra virgin olive oil
1 teaspoon vanilla

Mix ingredients until smooth with whisk, hand mixer, blender or food
processor. Scrape bowl or blender sides. Cover blender or bowl and
refrigerate for 30 minutes.

Spray a small nonstick skillet lightly with vegetable oil. Heat the skillet over medium-high heat. Ladle or pour about 2 tablespoons batter into the skillet with a small ladle or measuring cup; pour the batter beginning Buy Whole Wheat Pancakesat the outside of the crepe. Then immediately tilt and rotate the pan to spread the batter evenly over the bottom toward the center. If you fill from the center, you may have crispy edges.

Cook the crepe until the underside is lightly browned, about 30 seconds. Using a small metal spatula lift the edge of the crepe. You can flip it like a pancake or just serve it cooked on one side. When the batter loses its sheen it is done. If you prefer it brown on both sides it only takes about 15 or 20 seconds. Cook until the second side is lightly browned, about 20 seconds longer.

Immediately after you cook them, place them on a plate loosely covered with waxed paper. Don’t put them in a tightly sealed container until completely cooled or they will stick together.

Tip: Refrigerate crepes between sheets of wax paper for up to 2 days or freeze for up to 1 month.

Your imagination is the only limitation for fillings; here are some ideas to get you started:

Sweet Dessert Crepes

* Sautéed apples, sprinkled with cinnamon and nutmeg
* Blueberries and Neufchatel Cheese
* Chocolate hazelnut spread (so popular in Europe)
* Bananas, chocolate sauce and ice cream or yogurt
* Fresh sliced fruit (Strawberries, bananas, mangos, kiwi, pineapple) with whipped cream or yogurt

Unsweetened Crepes

* Smoked salmon and cream cheese
* Sautéed peppers, onions, mushrooms and chicken
* Ricotta, egg, salt and chopped basil or spinach.
Fill crepes and bake until ricotta is firm. 400º F about 10 to 15 minutes.
* Avocado, tomato, lettuce and salsa
* Neufchatel Cheese, capers, lime juice, sliced turkey – roll, chill in the refrigerator for an hour or two and cut into 1 inch pieces for appetizers.

Can You Imagine? Delicious Baked Donuts!
(Without deep fat frying)

The pictured donuts are Rhubarb Pecan Donuts, because Dr. Grandpa really loves rhubarb and nuts, and misses a bit his old donut days, He also enjoys with his mind the thought that these donuts are consistent with his goal of a Mediterranean Diet. Of course, Dr. Grandma’s Muffins Your Way already include the 100% organic whole wheat, extra virgin olive oil and Dr. Grandma’s Delight (all-natural, zero-calorie sweetener).

A second recipe for donuts that is not included in the Dr. Grandma’s recipe booklet is printed below; it’s Dad’s Double Delight Donuts – you could make it triple chocolate, if you frost with chocolate frosting. Or you can make these donuts with any of the twenty-two recipes in the muffin recipe booklet, but you will need to reduce the baking time to about 8 to 10 minutes.

A Touch of Tang – Rhubarb Pecan Donuts

Ingredients:

One Packet of Dr. Grandma’s Muffins Your Way Mix
¾ cup broken pecans or other nuts
1¼ cups finely chopped rhubarb

Directions:

Preheat oven to 400º F.
Coat donut pan with vegetable spray.

Mix:
½ cup water plus included packet of Extra Virgin Olive Oil.
Two eggs or ½ cup egg substitute.

Stir together:
One 10.7 ounce packet of Dr. Grandma’s Muffins Your Way Mix.
¾ cup broken pecans or other nuts.
1 ¼ cups finely chopped rhubarb

Stir two mixtures together until just moist – do not over mix. Fill 9 spaces in baking donut pan.

Bake until golden brown and a toothpick comes out clean, from the thickest part of the donut, about 8 to 10 minutes.

Remove
from donut tin to wire rack immediately, before cooling. Dip hot donuts
in cinnamon sugar or Frost completely cool donuts.

Makes 9 donuts.
Can be frozen

Dad’s Double Delight Donuts

Ingredients:

One Packet of Dr. Grandma’s Muffins Your Way Mix
1 cup chocolate chips
1/3 cup unsweetened baking cocoa
1 cup unsweetened applesauce
Directions:
Preheat oven to 400º F.
Coat donut pan with vegetable spray.

Mix:

½ cup water plus included packet of Extra Virgin Olive Oil.
Two eggs or ½ cup egg substitute
1 cup unsweetened applesauce

Stir together:

One 10.7 ounce packet of Dr. Grandma’s Muffins Your Way Mix.
1 cup chocolate chips
1/3 cup unsweetened baking cocoa

Stir two mixtures together until just moist – do not over mix. Fill 9 spaces in baking donut pan.

Bake until golden brown and a toothpick comes out clean from the thickest part of the donut, about 8 to 10 minutes.

Remove
from donut tin to wire rack immediately, before cooling. Dip hot donuts
in cinnamon sugar or Frost completely cool donuts. You could top with
chocolate frosting, but then you’d lose the alliteration – you’d have
to name them DTDD – Dad’s Triple Delight Donuts.

Makes 9 donuts.
Can be frozen

Apple Donuts with Carmel Glaze

Ingredients:
One Packet of Dr. Grandma’s Muffins Your Way Mix
2 cups diced (1/2 inch pieces) fresh baking apples, like Roma, Rome Beauty, Fuji,
Granny Smith, Jonathan, McIntosh, Newton Pippin, Rhode Island Greening, or
Winesap.
½ tsp. cinnamon (optional)
½ cup water plus included packet of Extra Virgin Olive Oil.
Two eggs or ½ cup egg substitute

Rhubarb Pecan Donuts BatchDirections:
Preheat oven to 400º F.
Coat donut pan with vegetable spray.

Mix:
½ cup water
Included packet of Extra Virgin Olive Oil.
Two eggs or ½ cup egg substitute

Stir together:

One 10.7 ounce packet of Dr. Grandma’s Muffins Your Way Mix, diced apples and optional cinnamon.

Stir two mixtures together until just moist – do not over mix. Fill 9 baking donut tins.

Bake until golden brown and a toothpick comes out clean from the thickest part of the donut, about 8 to 10 minutes.

Remove from donut tin to wire rack immediately, before cooling. Glaze with recipe below.

Caramel-Pecan Glaze

¾ cup Dr. Grandma’s Delight
1/3 cup buttermilk
½ tsp. baking soda
1/3 cup butter
½ tsp. molasses
½ tsp. vanilla extract

Combine all ingredients in a saucepan, boil for 10 minutes, stirring frequently.

Pour caramel glaze over 9 baked apple donuts, or other recipe of your choice. While still hot, sprinkle with chopped toasted pecans, if desired.

Makes 9 donuts.
Can be frozen