Beautiful Comforting Soup in January

January 14, 2010 in Antioxidants, Blog Recipes, Cooking & Baking Hints, Diabetic Menu Item, Mediterranean, Nutrition, Weight Management, Whole Grains by Joyce Bunderson

January is national soup month; soup is worth remembering most every month, but cold and sometime dreary January days can make warm soup in the tummy pretty rewarding.  You may have noticed the new ice pictures on the blog home page, next to comforting foods, that make this point.

Soup is at the heart and soul of many issues that are my pet topics; the Mediterranean diet, diabetic menu items, antioxidants, real whole foods, nutrition, cost effective menus, weigh management and comfort foods. It can take hours or can be almost a fast food, if you have ingredients in your refrigerator, freezer and cupboard. Taking advantage of cooking ahead and having soup ingredients already cooked in your freezer is an immense time bonus.

Soup, simple or complex; from a can or from ordinary ingredients – can be a comfort food for a cold day. You don’t need to be a chef to make a fine pot of soup; it’s truly difficult to fail. Auguste Escoffier, an honored French Chef (1846 – 1935), is quoted as having said: "Soup puts the heart at ease, calms down the violence of hunger, eliminates the tension of the day, and awakens and refines the appetite."

Abraham Maslow (1908 – 1970) the philosopher and psychologist who wrote of his theory of hierarchical needs said that; “A first rate soup is better than a second rate painting.”  So why not take the first step toward adding a new healthy item to your regular cooking repertoire, if soup is not already there.

Yes, I’ve heard about slurping soup, but Miss Manners, Judith Martin (1938 - ) does not suggest abandoning it because of the slurp trap; of soup she says: "Do you have a kinder, more adaptable friend in the food world than soup? Who soothes you when you are ill? Who refuses to leave you when you are impoverished and stretches its resources to give a hearty sustenance and cheer? Who warms you in the winter and cools you in the summer? Yet who also is capable of doing honor to your richest table and impressing your most demanding guests? Soup does its loyal best, no matter what undignified conditions are imposed upon it. You don't catch steak hanging around when you're poor and sick, do you?" 
I like her words, they make me feel even more than comforted by my bowl of soup.

One other drawback of soup could be necktie mortality, but I say, “It’s worth the risk.” One of Murphy’s Laws is this: “A clean tie attracts the soup of the day.” Dr. Grandpa agrees that Murphy had a point, but his own theory is that there is a tummy magnet that pulls drips off the spoon.  A clean tie simply increases its power.  He also agrees that the soup is worth the precaution of a napkin.

Ludwig van Beethoven, the German Composer (1770 – 1827) said: “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.” I’m not an expert on this aspect of soup, but hopefully my heart is January is national soup month; soup is worth remembering most every month, but cold and sometime dreary January days can make warm soup in the tummy pretty rewarding.  You may have noticed the new ice pictures on the blog home page, next to comforting foods, that make this point.

English author, Lewis Carroll (1832 – 1898) seemed to betray the Mad Hatter’s Tea when he wrote: "Beautiful soup! Who cares for fish, game or any other dish? Who would not give all else for two pennyworth of beautiful soup?" Is the soup pictured below, beautiful? I will share that it made our taste buds happy and our tummies warm on a cold January evening.

I don’t think I can resist mention of the Soup Nazi? I should resist, but I’ve laughed my head off watching the sitcoms involving him. So to be honest to self, the Soup Nazi is in.

This Quick Sea Soup recipe can be repeatedly altered and still be delicious.